How To Get The Most Out Of Professional Coaching

Having a professional coach is pretty awesome! I can be the difference between liking your work, and ABSOLUTELY LOVING IT! But it’s not for the faint hearted. Be warned, coaching requires a pretty considerable investment of your time and energy.

As a coach, I can help you achieve your goals and reach the next level. That “next level” varies from person to person. It may be:
⚪ planning for changes that you’d like to make to your teaching practise
⚪ developing your leadership skills
⚪ exploring how to succeed in a new role
⚪ figuring out how to enhance your own wellbeing
⚪ inspiring those you work with, etc.
Everyone is unique, and the possibilities are endless.

No matter what the area of focus is in coaching, it is crucial that you, as the coachee, know how to make the most out of your coaching experience.

Here are a couple of ways that you can make the most out of a coaching session.

Identify what you want to focus on BEFORE the first session.
It helps to come into each coaching session with an area or idea that you would like to focus on. You really can do anything with the support of a coach, but you simply can’t do everything.
The more specific you can be about the area that you want to work on, the better your results will be over time. Coaching is all about depth, not so much about breadth.
(Don’t worry if you come to your first few coaching conversations having no idea what you want to talk about. You’ll get better at this over time, I promise).

Keep a journal.
I always send out notes within 2 - 3 days after each coaching conversation that we have. I highly recommend that you have a pen and paper during the session too as well as considering keeping some sort of record of what is happening between coaching sessions. This will not only help you self-reflect, but allow you to bring real-life situations into future sessions. Sharing specific situations takes the discussion deeper, and that’s what we’re all about.
Review your notes before the coaching session to help you focus. When you have specific details to share, it helps us to really get to the root of the challenge or goal that you’re working on.

Be open.
In a coaching relationship, it is critical for the coachee to be open and honest. Connection and trust between the coach and coachee are crucial and I treat your confidentiality with the utmost importance. I will ask you thought-provoking, inspiring, challenging, supportive and powerful questions to help you identify the root of whatever challenge you are wanting to smash your way through, other possibilities and/or what is next. When you provide honest and transparent answers, you will have more meaningful results.

Be prepared to be challenged.
I will ask you questions to help challenge your thinking and help you see other possibilities. You will be taking an inward look and thinking critically. As you work on achieving your goals, you will be challenged to get out of your comfort zone - and surprise surprise; that may feel a little bit uncomfortable. But remember, I am there to support, encourage, challenge you, and ultimately, create a space of accountability for what you have identified as your goals.
This is about pushing your professional boundaries, not healing any childhood trauma, so don’t worry- we’re not going there. I’m NOT a counsellor, but I know some incredible ones if it turns out that’s the kind of support you need.

Expect change, but don’t expect it straight away.
Don’t get me wrong, coaching can be life/career changing, but just as Rachel Hunter told us in the 90’s, it won’t happen overnight.
You may have heard the quote, “what got you here won’t get you there.” To accomplish your goals, there is going to be a change in your behaviour, mindset or beliefs. This takes intentional and ongoing effort over a period of time. There’s absolutely no need to rush this - creating change is a loooooong game. I’ll be right there to support you through this process.

 

So any time you feel like you're ready to go from good to great - hit me up.

You've got this!

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